10 Health Benefits of Being Single

Is your Newsfeed filling up with engagement rings and babies? Even if you’re happily unmarried, watching others make big life decisions can make you question your own. But marriage isn’t all it’s cracked up to be – especially since the quality of marriage can vary wildly. In fact, being single has a host of health benefits – like the ones listed here.

1. Single people have better bodies.

Forget the ‘freshman 15’ – it’s the relationship 15 you should watch out for now! Study after study shows that people gain weight when coupled up – about 24-30 pounds within the first 5 years of marriage. This is true even if you’re just in a relationship, since hitting the gym is replaced by cuddling and eating out (and if you’re a woman, trying to keep up with your partner’s too-big portions). In fact, a British survey found that over half of married people regularly fail to meet recommended physical activity requirements, as opposed to around 30% of single men and women.

2. Single people have healthier hearts.

All that exercising and eating right is good inside your body as well as out. After following 9,000 middle-aged adults for 8 years, a 2006 study found that never-married adults had the lowest rates of heart disease.

3. Single people have better social lives.

We all have that friend who disappeared once he/she got into a relationship. It’s a common occurrence – study after study shows that married people are worse at staying with touch with not only friends, but also family and neighbors. But having strong social ties is great for your mental health and could even help you live longer. Single people are more likely to carve out a community for themselves since they don’t have a marriage to fall back on.

4. Single people are less stressed.

Let’s face it: being married can be pretty high-stress. There are anniversary gifts to buy and fights to be had – plus married people do more housework and worry more about money. All that stress takes its toll, especially if you’re in one of the thousands of unhappy marriages. It negatively affects your immune system – couples experiencing lots of marital stress took 2 days longer to heal when researchers blistered their arms. Plus, women who bit their tongue during a fight were 4 times more likely to die over 10 years than women who always spoke their mind.

5. Single people get better sleep.

Sharing a marital bed might have emotional benefits, but it’s terrible for your sleep quality. Sleeping with another person involves dealing with snoring, plus compromising on room temperature, sleeping positions and maybe even bedtime. That’s why solo sleepers get better sleep and more of it – as much as an extra 49 minutes per night. And we all know sleep is essential for healthy body and brain function, which might explain why single people perform better on cognitive tests.

6. Single people drink less.

Well, women do, anyway. Researchers found that married women tend to drink more than single women, perhaps because they are trying to keep up with their partners. No word on how men’s alcohol habits are affected by marriage yet.

7. Single people might be having better sex.

You’d think after sleeping with the same partner for years, married people would be comfortable talking about sex. Apparently, that might not be the case. Match.com found that only 59% of married women talk about bedroom concerns, as opposed to 68 percent of single women, and 20% of them would do nothing to improve a dissatisfying sexual relationship. (11% of single women say the same).And talking about sex is crucial to a healthy relationship.

8. Singles get more time alone.

The stereotype of singles being lonely comes from the fact that singles spend more time alone. While too much solitude can be a bad things, some alone time is essential. Everybody needs time for themselves to refresh and recharge – and married people are far less likely to get it. That alone time is helped by the fact that single women in particular have 7 extra hours a week that married women spend on chores. A University of Michigan study found that after marriage, women do more housework while men do less.

9. Single people might be happier.

Or rather – single people aren’t as depressed as many imagine them to be. Marriage isn’t a magic bullet that transforms your happiness. In fact, studies show that your happiness levels remain essentially the same after marriage, other than a brief blip just after the wedding. Plus, a 2013 study found that a fear of being single causes you to A) settle for less in a relationship and B) not get out of a negative relationship.

10. Single people are more resilient.

Everybody has bad things happen to them. The key to how well and how quickly you bounce back from failure is how resilient you are. The greater your resilience, the better your mental health and the better you can resist illness. And single people might be more resilient, according to author Bella dePaulo. In fact, single women have more healthy days each year than their married counterparts.

What did you think of this article? Let us know in the comments, on Facebook or Tweet us @SuperheroYou!

Written by Sasha Graffagna

Photo Credit: patriziasoliani via Compfight cc

 

Is your Newsfeed filling up with engagement rings and babies? Even if you’re happily unmarried, watching others make big life decisions can make you question your own. But marriage isn’t all it’s cracked up to be – especially since the quality of marriage can vary wildly. In fact, being single has a host of health benefits – like the ones listed here.

1. Single people have better bodies.

Forget the ‘freshman 15’ – it’s the relationship 15 you should watch out for now! Study after study shows that people gain weight when coupled up – about 24-30 pounds within the first 5 years of marriage. This is true even if you’re just in a relationship, since hitting the gym is replaced by cuddling and eating out (and if you’re a woman, trying to keep up with your partner’s too-big portions). In fact, a British survey found that over half of married people regularly fail to meet recommended physical activity requirements, as opposed to around 30% of single men and women.

2. Single people have healthier hearts.

All that exercising and eating right is good inside your body as well as out. After following 9,000 middle-aged adults for 8 years, a 2006 study found that never-married adults had the lowest rates of heart disease.

3. Single people have better social lives.

We all have that friend who disappeared once he/she got into a relationship. It’s a common occurrence – study after study shows that married people are worse at staying with touch with not only friends, but also family and neighbors. But having strong social ties is great for your mental health and could even help you live longer. Single people are more likely to carve out a community for themselves since they don’t have a marriage to fall back on.

4. Single people are less stressed.

Let’s face it: being married can be pretty high-stress. There are anniversary gifts to buy and fights to be had – plus married people do more housework and worry more about money. All that stress takes its toll, especially if you’re in one of the thousands of unhappy marriages. It negatively affects your immune system – couples experiencing lots of marital stress took 2 days longer to heal when researchers blistered their arms. Plus, women who bit their tongue during a fight were 4 times more likely to die over 10 years than women who always spoke their mind.

5. Single people get better sleep.

Sharing a marital bed might have emotional benefits, but it’s terrible for your sleep quality. Sleeping with another person involves dealing with snoring, plus compromising on room temperature, sleeping positions and maybe even bedtime. That’s why solo sleepers get better sleep and more of it – as much as an extra 49 minutes per night. And we all know sleep is essential for healthy body and brain function, which might explain why single people perform better on cognitive tests.

6. Single people drink less.

Well, women do, anyway. Researchers found that married women tend to drink more than single women, perhaps because they are trying to keep up with their partners. No word on how men’s alcohol habits are affected by marriage yet.

7. Single people might be having better sex.

You’d think after sleeping with the same partner for years, married people would be comfortable talking about sex. Apparently, that might not be the case. Match.com found that only 59% of married women talk about bedroom concerns, as opposed to 68 percent of single women, and 20% of them would do nothing to improve a dissatisfying sexual relationship. (11% of single women say the same).And talking about sex is crucial to a healthy relationship.

8. Singles get more time alone.

The stereotype of singles being lonely comes from the fact that singles spend more time alone. While too much solitude can be a bad things, some alone time is essential. Everybody needs time for themselves to refresh and recharge – and married people are far less likely to get it. That alone time is helped by the fact that single women in particular have 7 extra hours a week that married women spend on chores. A University of Michigan study found that after marriage, women do more housework while men do less.

9. Single people might be happier.

Or rather – single people aren’t as depressed as many imagine them to be. Marriage isn’t a magic bullet that transforms your happiness. In fact, studies show that your happiness levels remain essentially the same after marriage, other than a brief blip just after the wedding. Plus, a 2013 study found that a fear of being single causes you to A) settle for less in a relationship and B) not get out of a negative relationship.

10. Single people are more resilient.

Everybody has bad things happen to them. The key to how well and how quickly you bounce back from failure is how resilient you are. The greater your resilience, the better your mental health and the better you can resist illness. And single people might be more resilient, according to author Bella dePaulo. In fact, single women have more healthy days each year than their married counterparts.

What did you think of this article? Let us know in the comments, on Facebook or Tweet us @SuperheroYou!

Written by Sasha Graffagna

Photo Credit: patriziasoliani via Compfight cc

 

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