10 Basic Manners We Should Bring Back

Your parents are usually responsible for teaching you manners. But as we get older, there’s nobody to tell us we’re being rude and sometimes we just forget. Follow these tips to remain as polite as you can be. Remember, politeness never hurt anybody.

  • Hold doors open. Contrary to popular belief, this applies to both men and women. Whether you’re entering or leaving the store, your office, or the bathroom, hold the door open in case there’s someone behind you.
  • Give up your seat. If you’re on the bus or train, give up your seat to an elderly, pregnant, or injured person. It’s the kind thing to do.
  • Send thank you notes. Always, ALWAYS send a quick thank-you email or note after a job interview. Since many people forget basic etiquette when it comes to digital interactions, doing so will set you apart from the rest of the applicants. And if someone invited you out for dinner or to an event? Definitely send a thank you note for that too.
  • Say, “Excuse me.” Too many people don’t apologize for bumping into others on the street. Don’t be that guy.
  • Avoid cursing in mixed company. There’s nothing wrong with cursing – but it can be off-putting. So clean up your language in front of people you don’t know well.
  • Put your phone down.  If you’re having a conversation with someone, whatever’s on your phone can wait. Make eye contact when you speak to other human beings. You know you should cut down on your screen use anyway.
  • Bring a gift. Whether you’re headed to a colleague’s house for a work dinner or to your best friend’s apartment, always bring something if you’re going to someone’s home. Try a six-pack of beer, a whole pizza, or even flowers. You’ll never be worried about overstaying your welcome.
  • RSVP. A lot of people think that not accepting an invitation is the same thing as declining it. That’s not at all true! Whether it’s a wedding or a Facebook event, it’s courteous to let people know that you can’t make it – instead of forcing them to ask you directly.
  • Call instead texting. Texting is now our primary source of communication. But calling someone can really brighten their day – especially if they’re having a bad one! Calling adds a personal touch that texts just don’t have. And a five-minute phone call can actually save you a lot of time since you won’t text back and forth for 20 minutes.
  • Don’t talk on the phone while in line. Waiting in line is super-boring, so it’s not uncommon to spend that time on the phone with someone. That in itself is not rude. But what is rude is being on the phone when you’re at the register. Having two conversations at once – one with your cashier and one with whoever’s on the phone – takes up twice as much time. So be considerate to the people behind you and hang up before you place an order. And yes, we’ve already talked about putting your phone down when talking to other people. But this scenario’s so important we had to mention it again.

Enjoyed this? Check out 10 Small Ways You Can Feel Like a Superhero!

Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Your parents are usually responsible for teaching you manners. But as we get older, there’s nobody to tell us we’re being rude and sometimes we just forget. Follow these tips to remain as polite as you can be. Remember, politeness never hurt anybody.

  • Hold doors open. Contrary to popular belief, this applies to both men and women. Whether you’re entering or leaving the store, your office, or the bathroom, hold the door open in case there’s someone behind you.
  • Give up your seat. If you’re on the bus or train, give up your seat to an elderly, pregnant, or injured person. It’s the kind thing to do.
  • Send thank you notes. Always, ALWAYS send a quick thank-you email or note after a job interview. Since many people forget basic etiquette when it comes to digital interactions, doing so will set you apart from the rest of the applicants. And if someone invited you out for dinner or to an event? Definitely send a thank you note for that too.
  • Say, “Excuse me.” Too many people don’t apologize for bumping into others on the street. Don’t be that guy.
  • Avoid cursing in mixed company. There’s nothing wrong with cursing – but it can be off-putting. So clean up your language in front of people you don’t know well.
  • Put your phone down.  If you’re having a conversation with someone, whatever’s on your phone can wait. Make eye contact when you speak to other human beings. You know you should cut down on your screen use anyway.
  • Bring a gift. Whether you’re headed to a colleague’s house for a work dinner or to your best friend’s apartment, always bring something if you’re going to someone’s home. Try a six-pack of beer, a whole pizza, or even flowers. You’ll never be worried about overstaying your welcome.
  • RSVP. A lot of people think that not accepting an invitation is the same thing as declining it. That’s not at all true! Whether it’s a wedding or a Facebook event, it’s courteous to let people know that you can’t make it – instead of forcing them to ask you directly.
  • Call instead texting. Texting is now our primary source of communication. But calling someone can really brighten their day – especially if they’re having a bad one! Calling adds a personal touch that texts just don’t have. And a five-minute phone call can actually save you a lot of time since you won’t text back and forth for 20 minutes.
  • Don’t talk on the phone while in line. Waiting in line is super-boring, so it’s not uncommon to spend that time on the phone with someone. That in itself is not rude. But what is rude is being on the phone when you’re at the register. Having two conversations at once – one with your cashier and one with whoever’s on the phone – takes up twice as much time. So be considerate to the people behind you and hang up before you place an order. And yes, we’ve already talked about putting your phone down when talking to other people. But this scenario’s so important we had to mention it again.

Enjoyed this? Check out 10 Small Ways You Can Feel Like a Superhero!

Written by Roselyn Sebastian

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