Bo Eason on Telling Your Story with Your Body

Bo Eason 2

In Part 1 of our interview with Bo Eason, the real-life superhero taught us how to turn our personal stories into a real-life superpower. Today, he teaches us how to tell that story in the best way possible.

SuperheroYou: You spoke earlier about how you can tell your story in both physical and verbal ways. Can you elaborate on the physical aspect?

Bo Eason: I was once told that people believe about 50% of what comes out of your mouth. So when somebody’s talking, you and I as an audience are constantly going, “Oh, yeah, I believe that. OK, I don’t believe that.” And you’re doing that about 50% of the time. But my body and your body is believed 100% of the time, because the body just doesn’t have the ability to lie. This is why politicians stand behind podiums. I always do this: I never let the people that I train use podiums or stand behind anything. I want the audience to be able to look at your body wherever they want to look. So they can look at my toe or my knee or my little pinky finger, because I want them to trust and believe in what I’m talking about. This is why storytelling’s so effective. But the minute you get behind a podium, your body is hidden. The reason they go behind podiums is because their body is betraying them. They haven’t been trained like I’ve been trained. I’ve been trained to express myself, physically. And if you look at any elite performer, from athletics to the best cellist in the world, the best ballet dancer in the world, the best pianist in the world, the most elite military members – Navy SEALS, Green Beret,  Army Rangers – their bodies tell the whole story. They’re so physically present with their body, and that body has to come through them or they are out of business. And by out of business, they’re dead in the water. Firefighters and law enforcement, if their body betrays them, they are done. But the rest of the world walks around as if their body’s not communicating.

Just as an experiment, think about this. Try right now for the next 10 seconds not to express yourself. Try to do no expression at all. And you’ll find in those 10 seconds that that is an impossibility. You cannot not express yourself. So when somebody’s overweight, that is an expression. When somebody is sitting in front of a TV eating candy for 8 hours a day, that is an expression. That is an active expression. When somebody is the fastest man or woman in the world in a sprint during the Olympics, that is full expression. You cannot not express yourself. So I want the people that I train to express themselves the way they want to be heard, because I know that the body’s going to be believed. And I know what comes out of their mouth may or may not be believed. So we have to have the trust and the intimacy with the audience. Therefore, you got to get your body up and running and physical and telling that story that you want to tell.

SHY: What’s one thing we should be doing to express ourselves physically as we tell our story?

BE: Every word that comes out of our mouths has a physical expression to it. Every thought, every image has a physical expression to it. So during the rehearsal process, we physicalize every word that comes out of our mouths – this is how I was trained. So you might say the word “power.” And the word power has a certain physical element to it. And whatever power means to you, you might clench your fist. You might hold your hands above your head in victory. You might be down on one knee bowing your head in prayer. That might be what power means to you. Whatever those terms and ideas and words are, we physicalize those words. We bring them to the physical body. And this is why, when people see me speak, they never talk about what I say. They only talk about what I do. If you look at any performance that’s ever won an Academy Award, it’s never what they say. It’s never the dialogue that was written for them, it’s always what they do physically. That wins them the award. And typically, the person who is the most physical gets rewarded with that award…even in a movie like My Left Foot. I remember Daniel Day-Lewis won for his performance, but he was in a wheelchair. He had some kind of disease where he couldn’t move. But he won it because he’s physical in a wheelchair. Everything he did had a physical gesture to it, like an eye squint or a clench of the lips or a deformed hand making a gesture.  You can be physical while you’re sitting, you can be physical while you’re laying down, you can be physical everywhere you are. We live in a world that is getting further and further away from its physicality, because we’re talking into these little tiny phones, in these little tiny computers, and our communication is getting smaller and smaller physically.

I have a theory that the people who will lead this world going forward, and the people that will have the biggest impact on the world will also be the most physical. Because when somebody is true to their own physical nature, you cannot take your eyes off of them. And so, for everybody reading this, I would have them think about the occupations and the people that they cannot take their eyes off of. And they’re going to have to go back into their own memories of this. So, for me, that is elite performers. I don’t care what it is. When you’re watching certain athletes play or do their sport, like say a gymnast in the Olympics, there are certain gymnasts that you cannot look away from. If they’re on TV, you do not go to the bathroom, you do not eat, you don’t talk to people, you just focus on them. And I guarantee you, it is because of their physicality. If you look at Mikhail Baryshnikov, the greatest ballet dancer ever, and you see him in an elevator, you cannot look away from this guy. You have to deal with the presence that he brings into that elevator. It’s not that he’s big or that he is the greatest of all time in an art form. It’s because of his physicality. Because of the miles that he’s already run, you cannot take your eyes off that guy.

If you and me were watching a Navy SEAL charge into oncoming fire, I guarantee you, we would not look away. If you and I put a lion or a tiger or a leopard or a cheetah on a stage, and we were in the audience, we would never look away from that animal. You wouldn’t move your coat, you wouldn’t open a candy, you wouldn’t go to the bathroom, you wouldn’t text your spouse, you wouldn’t breathe. You would just lock in on that predator cat. That is how I train the people that I work with. That’s how I was trained. Us human beings are predators. I know that word has a bad connotation because of what the media has made it out to be, but actually, a predator is one of the most noble creatures in the world and the most trustworthy. You know where they’re coming from. You know what they’re going to do. They’re very predictable, but we’ve assigned that term to the lowest of our society, so therefore we don’t believe that human beings are actually predators. We are predators, no different than a great white shark, a killer whale, or a tiger. Those killer whales, those great white sharks, and those predator cats, we don’t look away from. If somebody is in touch with their nature physically and doesn’t apologize for their nature as a human being, you will not have the ability to look away from them either. That’s why so few of us have this ability. Because we’re so ashamed and we’re so embarrassed physically that we’re constantly apologizing for who we naturally are. But elite athletes, Navy SEALs and Mikhail Baryshnikov don’t have time to apologize. They have to perform. They have to survive. That’s why they’re the best in the world. That’s what I teach people to do. Because if you can’t do that, then people are going to dismiss you eventually. You’re going to become predictable, and then people are just not going to pay attention. And we can’t afford to let them not pay attention. You see politicians do this all the time. They apologize for their own physicality. What do you do when you see a politician stand behind a podium and talk with a bunch of microphones in front of them? Do you listen? Do you watch? Do you care? And I guarantee you, everyone reading this is going to go, “Yeah, I can hear, the volume’s up, but I can’t really hear what they’re saying.” They do that because they don’t let you see their whole body. Their bodies are betraying them. Therefore, that’s why we have a lack of trust in this country, and other countries too, but that’s the main reason. We have to be able to see somebody’s physicality to actually have intimacy and trust them.

SHY: You talk about how it’s important for us not to apologize for our own physicality, and to stop feeling ashamed about it. What’s the first step in doing that?

BE: Notice what you do to protect yourself. That’s the first thing. We all have a tell, like poker has a tell – people give themselves away. We all apologize. For example, for ladies, it’s really easy. When they’re on a stage or they’re in front of a camera or they’re giving a toast to the dinner party, ladies do a couple of things. One, they’ll cross their legs: they’ll put their right foot on the other side of their left foot and cross their legs while they’re standing. Now this is the most unnatural move any woman’s ever made. But they do it, and they only do it when people are looking at them. They cross their feet, or they put their feet so close together that air cannot make its way between them. And their legs are so sandwiched together that no light can be seen between their legs. That’s two things that ladies do with their feet. First thing I do when I have a woman client, I look at their feet, and their feet tell me the whole story. If they cross them, or if they sandwich their legs so tightly together, they are apologizing for their femininity. They’re apologizing for the greatest thing that they are. They’ll also cross their arms right in front of their breasts. Physically, what is that story telling us? Crossing my legs and covering my breasts. What is that telling us? Everyone can make up their own answer there, but it’s telling us, I’m not comfortable with the physicality that I have with my own femininity. With my own power. Women are the most powerful thing on the planet, and you’re going to apologize and cover up the most powerful thing that you are on this planet, that God’s ever created. They also will do this: they will clench their hands together, but very low in front of their waist, and they hold their hands so tightly together. They’re just clenching and clenching. You can see lady politicians do this all the time because they want to have power up there on stage, but they’re trying to be a man. They want to have a man’s power, which [is] a mistake. You don’t want a woman with man’s power. You want a woman with woman power, which looks completely different. So you cannot clench and hide the very power that you naturally and truly have. That’s what ladies do, and whoever’s reading this, they have to watch what they do.

Men do it a little bit differently. Men don’t want to appear dangerous these days. Because we’re dangerous people, we’re predators, we can do some damage. But what did we do that first day when we went to school, us boys? They said, “Okay boys, line up right here.” And that’s what the teacher said at the playground. Now, these boys are fighting and scratching, throwing sand in each other’s eyes, punching each other in the eye to get to be first place in that line. That’s who we are – we’re competitive. We want to win. We want to be first. And what does the teacher tell us as soon as we start kicking each other’s butts on our way to being first in line? The teacher tells us, don’t do that. That’s bad. Be nice. Keep your hands to yourself and form into line. And they, thus, have ruined everything that’s great about a man, or a boy in this case. So now that boy grows up doing everything he can to stifle his own primitive instincts. But if you think of the occupations that we admire the most, that we can never look away from, whether it’s the ballet dancer or the football player or the Navy SEAL, the thing that those men have that most men are hiding is that they express themselves physically. They let it all out there. Because they have to survive, or they’re out of business. So most men will cross their arms and they’ll clench their hands in front of them, a little bit different than a woman, in front of their heart about a foot away from their actual chest. You see weathermen do this. Your weatherman’s going to come out today and his hands are going to be in front of his chest about a foot in front of his chest and his fingers are going to be interlaced. And that is the most unnatural way to put your hands in front of your body. Nobody in their right mind would ever do that if they weren’t a weatherman or if they weren’t in front of people. The only reason men do that is to protect their heart. Because when you’re a boy, you have this huge heart and it is a primitive heart, a warrior heart. And somebody took a sword and went right after that heart, whether it was the little grade school teacher who told you to get in line or it was somebody who told you that your instincts are wrong, and they’re bad. And so, all of us guys, including me, have a habit of protecting our heart for the rest of our lives. Once you recognize your protective mechanism, you just drop your hands.

As soon as you understand what your protective mechanism is, what that physical movement is, then you can correct it. You can right the ship by just not doing it. That is the number one thing that I’m constantly working with people on. And I’m on stage all the time. I’ve spoken thousands and thousands of times, but I still do it. I still have my protection mechanisms, but I notice that I’m doing it, and then I stop doing it. That’s what people should know to do. You’ll probably never stop protecting yourself. But you’ve got to notice when you’re doing it and then stop doing it.

SHY:  Do you have any age-specific advice regarding the personal story for people who are in their 20s or 30s?

BE: Young people are great storytellers. Young people and very old people are great storytellers. Because if those young people in their 20s and 30s look at their great-grandparents, even if their grandparents are very far along up at 75 or 80, they’re excellent storytellers from that generation. They can tell of how they used to walk to school in the snow and suffer through World War II and survive. The storytellers in between these young people and their great grandparents have gotten away from storytelling. We’re not very physical at it. We’ve lost our way with it. We’re not very personal with it. I think the younger generation, because they’ve grown up in the digital age, they’re very good storytellers. If you’re good on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, you know how to tell a story very briefly, with a picture or with 140 characters. They’re very good storytellers.

What I would encourage that age to do is get in touch with their bodies. Because they’ve grown up in an information age. It’s nonphysical. But I think we’ve left that age and now we’re going to get back into physicality, where the people that are going to lead us going forward and that are going to have the biggest impact going forward are the people who we can see their whole body. So I would encourage the youth to get in touch with their physicality. And I would do this by way of classes. It might be dance class, yoga or an athletic sport. Because if you’re a dancer, a yogi, or an athlete, you have to use your body and your body tells the story. I would encourage them to use less words and more body – more physicality. And just rehearse, practice and be conscious of their body at all times. I was trained by a physical coach and as far as I’m concerned, he’s the best in the world at what he does, which is why a lot of the most elite performers use him. He is constantly physicalizing all of our expression. So if my expression is in a word, he makes us physicalize that word. If my expression is in an athletic event, that body’s gotta be freed up to express itself so that it can win. So that it can perform at the level that it needs to perform at.

When you live in a society in a culture that we live in, our bodies are not being used. But if we let this thing out in the wild, it has to be used to survive. There’s this tribe in Africa called the Nuba tribe. And one thing that distinguishes the Nuba tribe from other tribes in the area is that the Nuba tribe never gets eaten by predator cats, yet they live among them, while other tribes are losing men and tribeswomen to the predator cats. And theory being that it’s the Nuba tribe’s physicality that keeps the predator cats from eating them. We live in a world where we think we’re safe and there’s no predators going to eat us. So we walk into Starbucks dragging our feet with our head down looking at our phone, nonchalant, shoulders slumped, like we’re taking a walk in a park. Well, if a Nuba tribe member does that, they die – they get eaten. If a Navy SEAL does that, they die. If a firefighter charging into a burning building does that, they die. If an elite athlete moves like that, they might as well be dead, because someone’s going to take you out.

I want the young generation to get in touch with their own predator instincts. Their own physicality. They have grown up in a society that is against that. If you are physical, they go after you. They say you’re trying to be too sexy, or you’re trying to be strong, or you’re being dangerous. That’s what the media and the people will tell you when somebody is completely primitive in their physicality. That is a gift. That’s wrong. That is the best thing that we are and that we’ve got. Because true predators, like a cheetah or a lion, are very trustworthy, and they’re very noble, and so are us human beings. The only reason us human beings get away from our trustworthiness and our nobility is because we’re trying to hide our true nature. And if you try to hide that long enough, that thing is going to come out in some crazy ass way. That is when people start crossing boundaries, committing crimes, hurting people, because all that primitive nature is being so stifled. All that physicality is being held back, because they’ve been taught that it’s bad to have. That thing is going to come out in some perverse, creepy way. But I want the young people to access it, to have permission to let that baby out. And that’s why I say take the classes. Get into somewhere you can really be physical, whether that’s climbing a mountain, dance, yoga. And the place that they get it the most probably is behind closed doors. If you think of sex, that’s when they can be fully expressive physically because nobody’s watching for the most part. That’s a place where they realize that kind of physical permission that can be taken outside of the bedroom. I’m not saying that you’re out having sex in public; I’m saying that that primitive nature that you naturally have, you can let that baby out. You’re not going to hurt anybody. Media will have you believe that you’re going to hurt somebody if you allow that out. You will not.

Liked this? Check out Bo Eason on How to Turn Your Story Into A Real-Life Superpower!

Written by Sasha Graffagna

In Part 1 of our interview with Bo Eason, the real-life superhero taught us how to turn our personal stories into a real-life superpower. Today, he teaches us how to tell that story in the best way possible.

SuperheroYou: You spoke earlier about how you can tell your story in both physical and verbal ways. Can you elaborate on the physical aspect?

Bo Eason: I was once told that people believe about 50% of what comes out of your mouth. So when somebody’s talking, you and I as an audience are constantly going, “Oh, yeah, I believe that. OK, I don’t believe that.” And you’re doing that about 50% of the time. But my body and your body is believed 100% of the time, because the body just doesn’t have the ability to lie. This is why politicians stand behind podiums. I always do this: I never let the people that I train use podiums or stand behind anything. I want the audience to be able to look at your body wherever they want to look. So they can look at my toe or my knee or my little pinky finger, because I want them to trust and believe in what I’m talking about. This is why storytelling’s so effective. But the minute you get behind a podium, your body is hidden. The reason they go behind podiums is because their body is betraying them. They haven’t been trained like I’ve been trained. I’ve been trained to express myself, physically. And if you look at any elite performer, from athletics to the best cellist in the world, the best ballet dancer in the world, the best pianist in the world, the most elite military members – Navy SEALS, Green Beret,  Army Rangers – their bodies tell the whole story. They’re so physically present with their body, and that body has to come through them or they are out of business. And by out of business, they’re dead in the water. Firefighters and law enforcement, if their body betrays them, they are done. But the rest of the world walks around as if their body’s not communicating.

Just as an experiment, think about this. Try right now for the next 10 seconds not to express yourself. Try to do no expression at all. And you’ll find in those 10 seconds that that is an impossibility. You cannot not express yourself. So when somebody’s overweight, that is an expression. When somebody is sitting in front of a TV eating candy for 8 hours a day, that is an expression. That is an active expression. When somebody is the fastest man or woman in the world in a sprint during the Olympics, that is full expression. You cannot not express yourself. So I want the people that I train to express themselves the way they want to be heard, because I know that the body’s going to be believed. And I know what comes out of their mouth may or may not be believed. So we have to have the trust and the intimacy with the audience. Therefore, you got to get your body up and running and physical and telling that story that you want to tell.

SHY: What’s one thing we should be doing to express ourselves physically as we tell our story?

BE: Every word that comes out of our mouths has a physical expression to it. Every thought, every image has a physical expression to it. So during the rehearsal process, we physicalize every word that comes out of our mouths – this is how I was trained. So you might say the word “power.” And the word power has a certain physical element to it. And whatever power means to you, you might clench your fist. You might hold your hands above your head in victory. You might be down on one knee bowing your head in prayer. That might be what power means to you. Whatever those terms and ideas and words are, we physicalize those words. We bring them to the physical body. And this is why, when people see me speak, they never talk about what I say. They only talk about what I do. If you look at any performance that’s ever won an Academy Award, it’s never what they say. It’s never the dialogue that was written for them, it’s always what they do physically. That wins them the award. And typically, the person who is the most physical gets rewarded with that award…even in a movie like My Left Foot. I remember Daniel Day-Lewis won for his performance, but he was in a wheelchair. He had some kind of disease where he couldn’t move. But he won it because he’s physical in a wheelchair. Everything he did had a physical gesture to it, like an eye squint or a clench of the lips or a deformed hand making a gesture.  You can be physical while you’re sitting, you can be physical while you’re laying down, you can be physical everywhere you are. We live in a world that is getting further and further away from its physicality, because we’re talking into these little tiny phones, in these little tiny computers, and our communication is getting smaller and smaller physically.

I have a theory that the people who will lead this world going forward, and the people that will have the biggest impact on the world will also be the most physical. Because when somebody is true to their own physical nature, you cannot take your eyes off of them. And so, for everybody reading this, I would have them think about the occupations and the people that they cannot take their eyes off of. And they’re going to have to go back into their own memories of this. So, for me, that is elite performers. I don’t care what it is. When you’re watching certain athletes play or do their sport, like say a gymnast in the Olympics, there are certain gymnasts that you cannot look away from. If they’re on TV, you do not go to the bathroom, you do not eat, you don’t talk to people, you just focus on them. And I guarantee you, it is because of their physicality. If you look at Mikhail Baryshnikov, the greatest ballet dancer ever, and you see him in an elevator, you cannot look away from this guy. You have to deal with the presence that he brings into that elevator. It’s not that he’s big or that he is the greatest of all time in an art form. It’s because of his physicality. Because of the miles that he’s already run, you cannot take your eyes off that guy.

If you and me were watching a Navy SEAL charge into oncoming fire, I guarantee you, we would not look away. If you and I put a lion or a tiger or a leopard or a cheetah on a stage, and we were in the audience, we would never look away from that animal. You wouldn’t move your coat, you wouldn’t open a candy, you wouldn’t go to the bathroom, you wouldn’t text your spouse, you wouldn’t breathe. You would just lock in on that predator cat. That is how I train the people that I work with. That’s how I was trained. Us human beings are predators. I know that word has a bad connotation because of what the media has made it out to be, but actually, a predator is one of the most noble creatures in the world and the most trustworthy. You know where they’re coming from. You know what they’re going to do. They’re very predictable, but we’ve assigned that term to the lowest of our society, so therefore we don’t believe that human beings are actually predators. We are predators, no different than a great white shark, a killer whale, or a tiger. Those killer whales, those great white sharks, and those predator cats, we don’t look away from. If somebody is in touch with their nature physically and doesn’t apologize for their nature as a human being, you will not have the ability to look away from them either. That’s why so few of us have this ability. Because we’re so ashamed and we’re so embarrassed physically that we’re constantly apologizing for who we naturally are. But elite athletes, Navy SEALs and Mikhail Baryshnikov don’t have time to apologize. They have to perform. They have to survive. That’s why they’re the best in the world. That’s what I teach people to do. Because if you can’t do that, then people are going to dismiss you eventually. You’re going to become predictable, and then people are just not going to pay attention. And we can’t afford to let them not pay attention. You see politicians do this all the time. They apologize for their own physicality. What do you do when you see a politician stand behind a podium and talk with a bunch of microphones in front of them? Do you listen? Do you watch? Do you care? And I guarantee you, everyone reading this is going to go, “Yeah, I can hear, the volume’s up, but I can’t really hear what they’re saying.” They do that because they don’t let you see their whole body. Their bodies are betraying them. Therefore, that’s why we have a lack of trust in this country, and other countries too, but that’s the main reason. We have to be able to see somebody’s physicality to actually have intimacy and trust them.

SHY: You talk about how it’s important for us not to apologize for our own physicality, and to stop feeling ashamed about it. What’s the first step in doing that?

BE: Notice what you do to protect yourself. That’s the first thing. We all have a tell, like poker has a tell – people give themselves away. We all apologize. For example, for ladies, it’s really easy. When they’re on a stage or they’re in front of a camera or they’re giving a toast to the dinner party, ladies do a couple of things. One, they’ll cross their legs: they’ll put their right foot on the other side of their left foot and cross their legs while they’re standing. Now this is the most unnatural move any woman’s ever made. But they do it, and they only do it when people are looking at them. They cross their feet, or they put their feet so close together that air cannot make its way between them. And their legs are so sandwiched together that no light can be seen between their legs. That’s two things that ladies do with their feet. First thing I do when I have a woman client, I look at their feet, and their feet tell me the whole story. If they cross them, or if they sandwich their legs so tightly together, they are apologizing for their femininity. They’re apologizing for the greatest thing that they are. They’ll also cross their arms right in front of their breasts. Physically, what is that story telling us? Crossing my legs and covering my breasts. What is that telling us? Everyone can make up their own answer there, but it’s telling us, I’m not comfortable with the physicality that I have with my own femininity. With my own power. Women are the most powerful thing on the planet, and you’re going to apologize and cover up the most powerful thing that you are on this planet, that God’s ever created. They also will do this: they will clench their hands together, but very low in front of their waist, and they hold their hands so tightly together. They’re just clenching and clenching. You can see lady politicians do this all the time because they want to have power up there on stage, but they’re trying to be a man. They want to have a man’s power, which [is] a mistake. You don’t want a woman with man’s power. You want a woman with woman power, which looks completely different. So you cannot clench and hide the very power that you naturally and truly have. That’s what ladies do, and whoever’s reading this, they have to watch what they do.

Men do it a little bit differently. Men don’t want to appear dangerous these days. Because we’re dangerous people, we’re predators, we can do some damage. But what did we do that first day when we went to school, us boys? They said, “Okay boys, line up right here.” And that’s what the teacher said at the playground. Now, these boys are fighting and scratching, throwing sand in each other’s eyes, punching each other in the eye to get to be first place in that line. That’s who we are – we’re competitive. We want to win. We want to be first. And what does the teacher tell us as soon as we start kicking each other’s butts on our way to being first in line? The teacher tells us, don’t do that. That’s bad. Be nice. Keep your hands to yourself and form into line. And they, thus, have ruined everything that’s great about a man, or a boy in this case. So now that boy grows up doing everything he can to stifle his own primitive instincts. But if you think of the occupations that we admire the most, that we can never look away from, whether it’s the ballet dancer or the football player or the Navy SEAL, the thing that those men have that most men are hiding is that they express themselves physically. They let it all out there. Because they have to survive, or they’re out of business. So most men will cross their arms and they’ll clench their hands in front of them, a little bit different than a woman, in front of their heart about a foot away from their actual chest. You see weathermen do this. Your weatherman’s going to come out today and his hands are going to be in front of his chest about a foot in front of his chest and his fingers are going to be interlaced. And that is the most unnatural way to put your hands in front of your body. Nobody in their right mind would ever do that if they weren’t a weatherman or if they weren’t in front of people. The only reason men do that is to protect their heart. Because when you’re a boy, you have this huge heart and it is a primitive heart, a warrior heart. And somebody took a sword and went right after that heart, whether it was the little grade school teacher who told you to get in line or it was somebody who told you that your instincts are wrong, and they’re bad. And so, all of us guys, including me, have a habit of protecting our heart for the rest of our lives. Once you recognize your protective mechanism, you just drop your hands.

As soon as you understand what your protective mechanism is, what that physical movement is, then you can correct it. You can right the ship by just not doing it. That is the number one thing that I’m constantly working with people on. And I’m on stage all the time. I’ve spoken thousands and thousands of times, but I still do it. I still have my protection mechanisms, but I notice that I’m doing it, and then I stop doing it. That’s what people should know to do. You’ll probably never stop protecting yourself. But you’ve got to notice when you’re doing it and then stop doing it.

SHY:  Do you have any age-specific advice regarding the personal story for people who are in their 20s or 30s?

BE: Young people are great storytellers. Young people and very old people are great storytellers. Because if those young people in their 20s and 30s look at their great-grandparents, even if their grandparents are very far along up at 75 or 80, they’re excellent storytellers from that generation. They can tell of how they used to walk to school in the snow and suffer through World War II and survive. The storytellers in between these young people and their great grandparents have gotten away from storytelling. We’re not very physical at it. We’ve lost our way with it. We’re not very personal with it. I think the younger generation, because they’ve grown up in the digital age, they’re very good storytellers. If you’re good on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, you know how to tell a story very briefly, with a picture or with 140 characters. They’re very good storytellers.

What I would encourage that age to do is get in touch with their bodies. Because they’ve grown up in an information age. It’s nonphysical. But I think we’ve left that age and now we’re going to get back into physicality, where the people that are going to lead us going forward and that are going to have the biggest impact going forward are the people who we can see their whole body. So I would encourage the youth to get in touch with their physicality. And I would do this by way of classes. It might be dance class, yoga or an athletic sport. Because if you’re a dancer, a yogi, or an athlete, you have to use your body and your body tells the story. I would encourage them to use less words and more body – more physicality. And just rehearse, practice and be conscious of their body at all times. I was trained by a physical coach and as far as I’m concerned, he’s the best in the world at what he does, which is why a lot of the most elite performers use him. He is constantly physicalizing all of our expression. So if my expression is in a word, he makes us physicalize that word. If my expression is in an athletic event, that body’s gotta be freed up to express itself so that it can win. So that it can perform at the level that it needs to perform at.

When you live in a society in a culture that we live in, our bodies are not being used. But if we let this thing out in the wild, it has to be used to survive. There’s this tribe in Africa called the Nuba tribe. And one thing that distinguishes the Nuba tribe from other tribes in the area is that the Nuba tribe never gets eaten by predator cats, yet they live among them, while other tribes are losing men and tribeswomen to the predator cats. And theory being that it’s the Nuba tribe’s physicality that keeps the predator cats from eating them. We live in a world where we think we’re safe and there’s no predators going to eat us. So we walk into Starbucks dragging our feet with our head down looking at our phone, nonchalant, shoulders slumped, like we’re taking a walk in a park. Well, if a Nuba tribe member does that, they die – they get eaten. If a Navy SEAL does that, they die. If a firefighter charging into a burning building does that, they die. If an elite athlete moves like that, they might as well be dead, because someone’s going to take you out.

I want the young generation to get in touch with their own predator instincts. Their own physicality. They have grown up in a society that is against that. If you are physical, they go after you. They say you’re trying to be too sexy, or you’re trying to be strong, or you’re being dangerous. That’s what the media and the people will tell you when somebody is completely primitive in their physicality. That is a gift. That’s wrong. That is the best thing that we are and that we’ve got. Because true predators, like a cheetah or a lion, are very trustworthy, and they’re very noble, and so are us human beings. The only reason us human beings get away from our trustworthiness and our nobility is because we’re trying to hide our true nature. And if you try to hide that long enough, that thing is going to come out in some crazy ass way. That is when people start crossing boundaries, committing crimes, hurting people, because all that primitive nature is being so stifled. All that physicality is being held back, because they’ve been taught that it’s bad to have. That thing is going to come out in some perverse, creepy way. But I want the young people to access it, to have permission to let that baby out. And that’s why I say take the classes. Get into somewhere you can really be physical, whether that’s climbing a mountain, dance, yoga. And the place that they get it the most probably is behind closed doors. If you think of sex, that’s when they can be fully expressive physically because nobody’s watching for the most part. That’s a place where they realize that kind of physical permission that can be taken outside of the bedroom. I’m not saying that you’re out having sex in public; I’m saying that that primitive nature that you naturally have, you can let that baby out. You’re not going to hurt anybody. Media will have you believe that you’re going to hurt somebody if you allow that out. You will not.

Liked this? Check out Bo Eason on How to Turn Your Story Into A Real-Life Superpower!

Written by Sasha Graffagna

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