Brain Region of the Week: Broca’s Area

Brain Region of the Week: Medulla Oblongata

If you read the title of this article and understood what it said, you have your Broca’s Area to thank. Originally discovered by Pierre Paul Broca, our Brain Region of the Week is located in the frontal lobe — and is a major player in language comprehension and production.

People who have damaged Broca’s areas have trouble forming sentences with correct syntax or grammar. Damage to this area causes Broca’s aphasia. This makes producing language more difficult, but people with this condition can still comprehend language. It’s an expressive aphasia — so people who suffer from it know what they want to say, but have trouble actually getting the words out.

And as some of us know, language is more than just words coming out of your mouth. If you talk with your hands, your Broca’s area is responsible. Without this region, your mind wouldn’t be able to direct how you move your hands. So if you use sign language and damage your Broca’s area, you’re going to have trouble communicating.

Damage to your Broca’s area is usually caused by strokes, which makes it hard to prevent. So read up on your family history and be careful if you are at risk for stroke.

Enjoyed this? Brush up on last week’s region, the corpus callosum!

 Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Photo Credit: Hey Paul Studios via Compfight cc

If you read the title of this article and understood what it said, you have your Broca’s Area to thank. Originally discovered by Pierre Paul Broca, our Brain Region of the Week is located in the frontal lobe — and is a major player in language comprehension and production.

People who have damaged Broca’s areas have trouble forming sentences with correct syntax or grammar. Damage to this area causes Broca’s aphasia. This makes producing language more difficult, but people with this condition can still comprehend language. It’s an expressive aphasia — so people who suffer from it know what they want to say, but have trouble actually getting the words out.

And as some of us know, language is more than just words coming out of your mouth. If you talk with your hands, your Broca’s area is responsible. Without this region, your mind wouldn’t be able to direct how you move your hands. So if you use sign language and damage your Broca’s area, you’re going to have trouble communicating.

Damage to your Broca’s area is usually caused by strokes, which makes it hard to prevent. So read up on your family history and be careful if you are at risk for stroke.

Enjoyed this? Brush up on last week’s region, the corpus callosum!

 Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Photo Credit: Hey Paul Studios via Compfight cc

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