Brain Region of the Week: Corpus Callosum

Brain Region of the Week: Medulla Oblongata

This week’s Brain Region is the corpus callosum! It means “tough body” in Latin and it’s primarily responsible for connecting our left and right hemispheres. This means it transports motor, sensory, and cognitive information throughout your brain. Without the corpus callosum, using your brain would basically be the equivalent of trying to make a phone call when the telephone poles are down.

The corpus callosum is also crucial to how we see. It helps our brains direct our retinas and also helps integrate the information that we get from each eye so that we can understand what we’re seeing. Research has actually found that people who suffer from dyslexia have corpus callosums which don’t send signals across the brain fast enough. This results in people who suffer from hyperactivity and have trouble focusing.

The corpus callosum also plays a detrimental role when it comes to patients with severe epilepsy. Because the corpus callosum connects both sides of the brain, when someone with epilepsy has a seizure that starts in one hemisphere, the corpus callosum can often transfer that seizure to the other hemisphere. This is why some epileptics opt to have a “brain split procedure” which involves splitting the corpus callosum.

It’s clear that the corpus callosum is hugely important to brain function — and not just to epileptics or dyslexics. Imagine if you couldn’t direct your eyes to your computer screen! Or tell you fingers to type words on your keyboard! All this is possible because of our corpus callosum. So think thank you!

Enjoyed this? Brush up on last week’s region, the prefrontal cortex!

 Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Photo Credit: Hey Paul Studios via Compfight cc

This week’s Brain Region is the corpus callosum! It means “tough body” in Latin and it’s primarily responsible for connecting our left and right hemispheres. This means it transports motor, sensory, and cognitive information throughout your brain. Without the corpus callosum, using your brain would basically be the equivalent of trying to make a phone call when the telephone poles are down.

The corpus callosum is also crucial to how we see. It helps our brains direct our retinas and also helps integrate the information that we get from each eye so that we can understand what we’re seeing. Research has actually found that people who suffer from dyslexia have corpus callosums which don’t send signals across the brain fast enough. This results in people who suffer from hyperactivity and have trouble focusing.

The corpus callosum also plays a detrimental role when it comes to patients with severe epilepsy. Because the corpus callosum connects both sides of the brain, when someone with epilepsy has a seizure that starts in one hemisphere, the corpus callosum can often transfer that seizure to the other hemisphere. This is why some epileptics opt to have a “brain split procedure” which involves splitting the corpus callosum.

It’s clear that the corpus callosum is hugely important to brain function — and not just to epileptics or dyslexics. Imagine if you couldn’t direct your eyes to your computer screen! Or tell you fingers to type words on your keyboard! All this is possible because of our corpus callosum. So think thank you!

Enjoyed this? Brush up on last week’s region, the prefrontal cortex!

 Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Photo Credit: Hey Paul Studios via Compfight cc

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