Want to Fall in Love? Just Ask These Questions

Do you want to fall in love but don’t want go through the exhausting process of getting to know someone slowly over the course of a few months? All you have to do is ask your prospective lover these 36 questions from psychologist Aaron Aron’s study. The study posits that in order for two random participants to become closer, they have to share a mutual vulnerability.

The questions are split into 3 sets, each delving deeper and deeper into your personal information. Questions start off with the innocuous like: “What would constitute a ‘perfect’ day for you?” As you progress the questions cause you to reveal more and more about yourself like, “Of all the people in your family, whose death would you find most disturbing? Why?”

Asking these questions to a prospective date might seem a little insane. But it’s a commonsense way to to filter out people who you’re incompatible with.

Imagine if every person on a first date asked each other these questions. You’d end up letting your guard down in front of a perfect stranger, but think of the time you’d save. Instead of dating someone you might like and watching it slowly fizzle, you could avoid the fizzle and conserve your energy to find your most compatible partner.

Even if you don’t look at the science behind this theory, on its face it’s simple to understand why this approach would work. So much about relationships and personal intimacy is about letting your guard down. Feeling vulnerable in front of someone usually means that you trust them implicitly, which is a powerful thing.

Would you ever ask these questions on a first date? Let us know in the comments, on Facebook or Tweet us @SuperheroYou!

Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Photo Credit: Donald Lee Pardue via Compfight cc

Do you want to fall in love but don’t want go through the exhausting process of getting to know someone slowly over the course of a few months? All you have to do is ask your prospective lover these 36 questions from psychologist Aaron Aron’s study. The study posits that in order for two random participants to become closer, they have to share a mutual vulnerability.

The questions are split into 3 sets, each delving deeper and deeper into your personal information. Questions start off with the innocuous like: “What would constitute a ‘perfect’ day for you?” As you progress the questions cause you to reveal more and more about yourself like, “Of all the people in your family, whose death would you find most disturbing? Why?”

Asking these questions to a prospective date might seem a little insane. But it’s a commonsense way to to filter out people who you’re incompatible with.

Imagine if every person on a first date asked each other these questions. You’d end up letting your guard down in front of a perfect stranger, but think of the time you’d save. Instead of dating someone you might like and watching it slowly fizzle, you could avoid the fizzle and conserve your energy to find your most compatible partner.

Even if you don’t look at the science behind this theory, on its face it’s simple to understand why this approach would work. So much about relationships and personal intimacy is about letting your guard down. Feeling vulnerable in front of someone usually means that you trust them implicitly, which is a powerful thing.

Would you ever ask these questions on a first date? Let us know in the comments, on Facebook or Tweet us @SuperheroYou!

Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Photo Credit: Donald Lee Pardue via Compfight cc

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