Why You Should Resist Buying Every Generation of a Phone

Years ago, upgrading your cell phone meant getting a whole new phone with a completely different dynamic design. Each phone had something fascinatingly unique. Think back to 2007 when Danger, Inc. launched the Sidekick. This phone became popular because with one flick of your finger, the screen would rotate upright. Soon afterwards, people began trading in their Sidekicks for Blackberry’s. The small palm-sized device was the hottest thing to hit the market. Not only was it a business phone, but it also became the digital agenda with BBM (like instant-messaging).

Nowadays, the two phones dominating the market are the Android Galaxy and the iPhone. Because of their widespread popularity, Samsung and Apple have been capitalizing off consumers by cranking out a new generation of their phones almost every year.

Every generation is supposed to offer a whole new experience, with a better design, camera and display. Consumers buy into the hype and run to pre-order a phone every time a “new design” is created. But is it really worth it to upgrade every time a new phone comes out? The answer is absolutely NOT and here’s why:

It’s too much money.

Have you noticed how much money we’ve been pouring out lately for the latest phones? One cell phone costs as much as one month’s rent for a studio apartment. But we barely notice because phone companies like Sprint and T-Mobile have designed new leasing payment plans. So the price of the shiny new phone is broken up into payments of small portions over 22- 24 months. This may not be a concern to you depending on what your budget is. However, the common consumer wants an affordable phone with more bang for their buck.

Let’s take the iPhone as an example. The iPhone 6 Plus retails at $649. The iPhone 6s has about 4 “improved” features and 2 added features at the same price point as the 6 Plus, give or take a few dollars depending on the carrier. Seems fair enough. However, an upgrade from the $549 iPhone 6 to the 6 Plus is highway robbery. For a whopping $100, the only difference is the size of the phone and optical image stabilization (OIS).  This is a camera technology feature that uses a tiny gyroscope to detect a steady image and capture it even if your hand moves a little. Unless you are a professional Instagram model, this $100 difference isn’t worth the upgrade.

Let’s not forget it only costs $200.10 to manufacture an iPhone 6. Let that sink in.

Despite the price hikes between the iPhone generations, we consumers are enamored by the pretty colors and bigger designs. Besides, who doesn’t love a good selfie? There’s no denying the sleek iPhone is one of the coolest things evolving in technology. But maybe you should slow down on the upgrades and actually enjoy the phone you have now.

Start by getting the absolute best value out of your phone. No matter what phone you have, make sure you protect the hardware with a sturdy phone case. Are you one of these klutzy people prone to shattering your screen into a million pieces? Try a glass screen protector.

You also shouldn’t over-charge your phone. The iPhone takes about 2.5 hours to charge to 100%. If you constantly charge it for longer than that, you can actually reduce the longevity of the battery. This can cause the battery to die more quickly during the day.

Lastly, double-check if the latest system upgrade is meant for your phone. Not all updates are compatible with all phone versions.

These are just some of the things you should consider before upgrading your cell phone. Remember, waiting can be more exciting anyways. Think about the difference between the iPhone 4s and the iPhone 6. Now that’s what I call an upgrade!

Liked this? Check out 10 Ways to Save Money On Your Cell Phone Bill!

Written by Bianca Rosembert

Years ago, upgrading your cell phone meant getting a whole new phone with a completely different dynamic design. Each phone had something fascinatingly unique. Think back to 2007 when Danger, Inc. launched the Sidekick. This phone became popular because with one flick of your finger, the screen would rotate upright. Soon afterwards, people began trading in their Sidekicks for Blackberry’s. The small palm-sized device was the hottest thing to hit the market. Not only was it a business phone, but it also became the digital agenda with BBM (like instant-messaging).

Nowadays, the two phones dominating the market are the Android Galaxy and the iPhone. Because of their widespread popularity, Samsung and Apple have been capitalizing off consumers by cranking out a new generation of their phones almost every year.

Every generation is supposed to offer a whole new experience, with a better design, camera and display. Consumers buy into the hype and run to pre-order a phone every time a “new design” is created. But is it really worth it to upgrade every time a new phone comes out? The answer is absolutely NOT and here’s why:

It’s too much money.

Have you noticed how much money we’ve been pouring out lately for the latest phones? One cell phone costs as much as one month’s rent for a studio apartment. But we barely notice because phone companies like Sprint and T-Mobile have designed new leasing payment plans. So the price of the shiny new phone is broken up into payments of small portions over 22- 24 months. This may not be a concern to you depending on what your budget is. However, the common consumer wants an affordable phone with more bang for their buck.

Let’s take the iPhone as an example. The iPhone 6 Plus retails at $649. The iPhone 6s has about 4 “improved” features and 2 added features at the same price point as the 6 Plus, give or take a few dollars depending on the carrier. Seems fair enough. However, an upgrade from the $549 iPhone 6 to the 6 Plus is highway robbery. For a whopping $100, the only difference is the size of the phone and optical image stabilization (OIS).  This is a camera technology feature that uses a tiny gyroscope to detect a steady image and capture it even if your hand moves a little. Unless you are a professional Instagram model, this $100 difference isn’t worth the upgrade.

Let’s not forget it only costs $200.10 to manufacture an iPhone 6. Let that sink in.

Despite the price hikes between the iPhone generations, we consumers are enamored by the pretty colors and bigger designs. Besides, who doesn’t love a good selfie? There’s no denying the sleek iPhone is one of the coolest things evolving in technology. But maybe you should slow down on the upgrades and actually enjoy the phone you have now.

Start by getting the absolute best value out of your phone. No matter what phone you have, make sure you protect the hardware with a sturdy phone case. Are you one of these klutzy people prone to shattering your screen into a million pieces? Try a glass screen protector.

You also shouldn’t over-charge your phone. The iPhone takes about 2.5 hours to charge to 100%. If you constantly charge it for longer than that, you can actually reduce the longevity of the battery. This can cause the battery to die more quickly during the day.

Lastly, double-check if the latest system upgrade is meant for your phone. Not all updates are compatible with all phone versions.

These are just some of the things you should consider before upgrading your cell phone. Remember, waiting can be more exciting anyways. Think about the difference between the iPhone 4s and the iPhone 6. Now that’s what I call an upgrade!

Liked this? Check out 10 Ways to Save Money On Your Cell Phone Bill!

Written by Bianca Rosembert

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