5 Note-Taking Tips You Need to Know

superheroyou 5 Note-Taking Tips You Need to Know

Your days in the classroom may be over, but that doesn’t mean you’re done taking notes. We’re here to teach you how to take notes in the most effective way possible. Because if you can’t understand your notes, then you’ve just lost an opportunity to improve yourself.

  • Pinpoint key facts. The point of note-taking is not to be a human recorder. Struggling down to write exactly what everyone is saying is a waste of time. You’re better off paying attention to the most important facts and copying them down, whether by hand or digitally.
  • Ask questions. It’s crucial to understand the topic on which you’re taking notes. So if you’re writing something that someone has said and you don’t understand it, ask a question to clarify. If you don’t want to interrupt the lecture or presentation, you can always wait until afterwards.
  • Use shorthand. This is especially useful if you find yourself handwriting everything. Use as many abbreviations as you can so you don’t miss out on any important information. Of course, you can also use this tip if you type your notes.
  • Organize. Once class or lecture is over, what do you do with your notes? If you’ve recorded them in a digital space like a Word document, back up your information. (This applies to all of your other data as well of course.) If you wrote your notes by hand, it might be a good idea to scan or type them so you’re not out of luck if you lose them. Once you’ve backed up, it’s time to organize your notes. Label and store them so that they’ll be easier to pull up later on. And review your notes as you organize them! Doing so shortly after the presentation will help cement the information in your long-term memory.
  • Copy. What if you arrive late or have to leave an event early? It’s inconvenient but it happens. Or what if your laptop battery dies before you can finish taking notes? Even if none of these things happen, it’s always a good idea to find someone with whom you can compare notes. They might have taken down an important fact that you missed.

While these tips are by no means hard and fast rules, we hope they help you take notes and learn from them more easily. The better you are at learning new things, the better you are at unlocking your true potential.

Enjoyed this? Check out 10 Things I Learned from Techweek!

Written by Roselyn Sebastian

Your days in the classroom may be over, but that doesn’t mean you’re done taking notes. We’re here to teach you how to take notes in the most effective way possible. Because if you can’t understand your notes, then you’ve just lost an opportunity to improve yourself.

  • Pinpoint key facts. The point of note-taking is not to be a human recorder. Struggling down to write exactly what everyone is saying is a waste of time. You’re better off paying attention to the most important facts and copying them down, whether by hand or digitally.
  • Ask questions. It’s crucial to understand the topic on which you’re taking notes. So if you’re writing something that someone has said and you don’t understand it, ask a question to clarify. If you don’t want to interrupt the lecture or presentation, you can always wait until afterwards.
  • Use shorthand. This is especially useful if you find yourself handwriting everything. Use as many abbreviations as you can so you don’t miss out on any important information. Of course, you can also use this tip if you type your notes.
  • Organize. Once class or lecture is over, what do you do with your notes? If you’ve recorded them in a digital space like a Word document, back up your information. (This applies to all of your other data as well of course.) If you wrote your notes by hand, it might be a good idea to scan or type them so you’re not out of luck if you lose them. Once you’ve backed up, it’s time to organize your notes. Label and store them so that they’ll be easier to pull up later on. And review your notes as you organize them! Doing so shortly after the presentation will help cement the information in your long-term memory.
  • Copy. What if you arrive late or have to leave an event early? It’s inconvenient but it happens. Or what if your laptop battery dies before you can finish taking notes? Even if none of these things happen, it’s always a good idea to find someone with whom you can compare notes. They might have taken down an important fact that you missed.

While these tips are by no means hard and fast rules, we hope they help you take notes and learn from them more easily. The better you are at learning new things, the better you are at unlocking your true potential.

Enjoyed this? Check out 10 Things I Learned from Techweek!

Written by Roselyn Sebastian

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