How To Recall Your Dreams Tonight

KT_Dreams

“All men dream but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes to make it possible.” ~ T.E. Lawrence.

Dreams are still a great scientific mystery, with several theories on how  we dream, why we dream and what dreams mean. We also know some interesting facts about dreams:

– We dream on average 4-7 dreams, about one to two hours total, each night.

– Around 6 years of this time is spent dreaming. That’s more than 2,100 days in the dream world.

– Everyone dreams. Just because you don’t remember your dream doesn’t mean that you didn’t dream.

We also know several techniques to recall your dreams, available in this video. While these techniques require some background in Kwik Recall techniques, here are a few instantly useable Kwik Tips to help you remember your dreams.

1. Decide to Remember. The night before you sleep, make a conscious choice that you will recall your dreams.

2. Affirm You Will Remember. Set the intention before you sleep by saying out loud, multiple times, “I will recall my dreams.”

3. Manage Your Sleep. Rest and clear your mind before bedtime. Get plenty of sleep and establish regular sleep routines.

4. Stay Healthy. Some suggest it helps to not eat heavy/fatty meals or drink excess alcohol before bed, as it may hinder dream recall and reduce REM sleep.

5. Record Your Dreams. The act of recording trains your mind to be more sensitized to your dreams and to start paying more attention to them. Keep pen and paper by your bedside to record any lingering remembrance when you awake. Better yet, use a dedicated Dream Journal.  You can also use an audio or phone recorder.

6. Share Your Dreams. Talk about your dreams with others. The more often you acknowledge your dreams and bring them to the surface, the easier it will be to remember them.

Like all the memory training we do, whether it is for names, faces, numbers, speeches, foreign languages, etc, the ability to recall your dreams is a skill you can learn with a little practice and persistence.

Expect to recall your dreams, but don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t come right away. At first, you may only remember small parts, but the more you work with your dreams, the easier it will be to recall them.

An interesting potential ‘side effect’ of dream recall training is the experience of more lucid dreams. Lucid dreaming is the process of dreaming while being aware that you are dreaming. Lucid dreamers report sleeping adventures, problem solving, creative endeavors, and a multitude of other fantasy/learning experiences. As you can imagine, this is a highly desired skill.

If lucid dreaming is your goal, good dream recall is the first step, since better recall increases awareness of dreams in general.

How well do you recall your dreams? Have you ever experienced lucid dreaming? Have you tried any recall/lucid dreaming methods that have worked well for you? Would you like SuperheroYou to teach more techniques for lucid dreaming?

Just let us know in the comments, on Facebook, or on Twitter.

“All men dream but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes to make it possible.” ~ T.E. Lawrence.

Dreams are still a great scientific mystery, with several theories on how  we dream, why we dream and what dreams mean. We also know some interesting facts about dreams:

– We dream on average 4-7 dreams, about one to two hours total, each night.

– Around 6 years of this time is spent dreaming. That’s more than 2,100 days in the dream world.

– Everyone dreams. Just because you don’t remember your dream doesn’t mean that you didn’t dream.

We also know several techniques to recall your dreams, available in this video. While these techniques require some background in Kwik Recall techniques, here are a few instantly useable Kwik Tips to help you remember your dreams.

1. Decide to Remember. The night before you sleep, make a conscious choice that you will recall your dreams.

2. Affirm You Will Remember. Set the intention before you sleep by saying out loud, multiple times, “I will recall my dreams.”

3. Manage Your Sleep. Rest and clear your mind before bedtime. Get plenty of sleep and establish regular sleep routines.

4. Stay Healthy. Some suggest it helps to not eat heavy/fatty meals or drink excess alcohol before bed, as it may hinder dream recall and reduce REM sleep.

5. Record Your Dreams. The act of recording trains your mind to be more sensitized to your dreams and to start paying more attention to them. Keep pen and paper by your bedside to record any lingering remembrance when you awake. Better yet, use a dedicated Dream Journal.  You can also use an audio or phone recorder.

6. Share Your Dreams. Talk about your dreams with others. The more often you acknowledge your dreams and bring them to the surface, the easier it will be to remember them.

Like all the memory training we do, whether it is for names, faces, numbers, speeches, foreign languages, etc, the ability to recall your dreams is a skill you can learn with a little practice and persistence.

Expect to recall your dreams, but don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t come right away. At first, you may only remember small parts, but the more you work with your dreams, the easier it will be to recall them.

An interesting potential ‘side effect’ of dream recall training is the experience of more lucid dreams. Lucid dreaming is the process of dreaming while being aware that you are dreaming. Lucid dreamers report sleeping adventures, problem solving, creative endeavors, and a multitude of other fantasy/learning experiences. As you can imagine, this is a highly desired skill.

If lucid dreaming is your goal, good dream recall is the first step, since better recall increases awareness of dreams in general.

How well do you recall your dreams? Have you ever experienced lucid dreaming? Have you tried any recall/lucid dreaming methods that have worked well for you? Would you like SuperheroYou to teach more techniques for lucid dreaming?

Just let us know in the comments, on Facebook, or on Twitter.

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