10 More Productivity Tips for Remote Workers

Do you work from home – all the time or just one day a week? Are you a digital nomad? If our 10 Productivity Tips for Remote Workers weren’t enough for you, here are 10 more to help you get everything done.

1. Plan it out.

Many remote workers are paid not by the hour but based on their output. So to stay as productive as possible, it’s crucial to plan your schedule well. Set weekly goals. Break up your day into blocks dedicated to completing high-priority tasks. Most importantly, adjust as you go! Every evening, look at what you’ve accomplished and change your plans for the remaining week to accommodate the to-dos you didn’t finish. You might even have to put “Manage To-Do List,” on your list.

2. Have a warm-up and wind-down routine. 

When you work from home, it’s easy to jump straight from bed to your desk without even changing out of your pajamas. But it’s not a good idea! Just as you need to separate your work space and personal space, you need to separate your work life and your personal life. So have a routine to both warm up and wind down from work. In the morning, this probably means showering, brushing your teeth, getting dressed and having breakfast. In the evening, find an activity that helps you switch from work mode to personal mode – whether that’s removing a suit or a relaxing cup of tea.

3. Eat well.

Working remotely often means you have access to your kitchen throughout the days. But instead of taking advantage, many of us work through lunch and order delivery, or gorge ourselves on coffee shop pastries. If you’re lucky enough to work steps from your kitchen, use it! Eating nutritious meals keeps your energy up and lets you stay productive. So have breakfast, good lunches and dinner. Don’t want to cook during your workday? There are several recipes for make-ahead meals floating about the web. Prefer to eat out? At least have something nutritious instead of what is essentially candy.

4. Make distractions harder.

It’s tough to stay focused when you don’t have superiors looking over your shoulder, but there are several techniques you can try. Connect all your entertainment devices to a power strip you can turn off easily. Dedicate certain devices to work and others for play. Use programs like Freedom to restrict your access to certain websites or even the whole Internet. Write important documents on your smartphone and close any non-business tabs on your browser. Really struggling? Get out of the house  – even if you’re at a coffee shop with WiFi, you might feel public pressure to avoid watching Netflix.

5. Get the right tools.

Working remotely comes with its own set of challenges. Luckily, there are several tools out there to make it easier. Track billable hours with Toggl. Use Google Docs to share meeting agendas, and Basecamp to stay in touch with the team. You should also have several offline tools to work with when you want to stay off the Internet, like a good notebook and a text editor. Need something we haven’t mentioned? Check out the options on this list.

6. Track your time. 

Every worker should track where their time goes. But it’s especially important for people who don’t have built-in accountability partners working right next to them. Some workers like to manually write down what they’ve accomplished in certain time intervals – the Pomodoro technique works great for this. Others like a digital method. For those, we suggest installing RescueTime, which will automatically track your activity.

7. Communicate with the office.

Whether you’re the only digital nomad or part of a distributed team, staying connected to your co-workers and superiors can be tough. But there are several ways you can communicate effectively with the rest of your team. Sync with the team at the beginning or end of each work day. Designate certain hours in which co-workers can reach you, so they’re not bothering you as you are focused on a project. Update your superiors and teammates regularly on your projects; this keeps everyone in the loop, makes sure your accomplishments are noted when it’s review season, and gives you the motivation that comes when others recognize your accomplishment. Finally, be careful of how you talk to each other! It’s tough to read cues when you’re communicating on the Internet. Try using emoticons, be specific and always assume your colleagues have good intentions. Need clarification? Just ask.

8. Manage your energy.

People who work in offices rarely spend hours on end in front of their computers. They get up regularly for bathroom breaks, water breaks and just to chat with their neighbor across the way. But remote workers often spend too much time in front of their computers. Instead of feeling happy and fulfilled at the end of each day, you might feel drained and exhausted – which is no fun! So it’s important to manage your energy. Take short breaks throughout the day, ideally 5-10 minutes every hour. And build rituals into your day that help you stay focused! The flexibility that comes with a remote worker’s schedule means it’s OK to take a walk, a power nap, meditate or hit the gym when you need to.

9. Be present during meetings.

It’s tough enough to pay attention to a meeting when you’re sitting in the same room. If you’re just listening to people on Skype, sometimes the distractions of the Internet can be too much. But what if you miss something important? Take notes if you have to, but make sure you are present during meetings. Having trouble? Think of how upset you’d be if nobody paid attention to a meeting you were leading.

10. Take advantage.

Working remotely has some downsides, but there are a ton of upsides too. You can set your own schedule. You can hang out with your dog. You can even do some work while on a beach in Costa Rica! After a while of working remotely, you’ll learn exactly what you need to be productive while maintaing a good balance between your professional and personal lives. And a lot of those necessities are things you might not have access to if you worked in an office! So take advantage of working remotely – whatever that means to you.

Liked this? Check out 10 Productivity Tips for Remote Workers!

Written by Sasha Graffagna

Do you work from home – all the time or just one day a week? Are you a digital nomad? If our 10 Productivity Tips for Remote Workers weren’t enough for you, here are 10 more to help you get everything done.

1. Plan it out.

Many remote workers are paid not by the hour but based on their output. So to stay as productive as possible, it’s crucial to plan your schedule well. Set weekly goals. Break up your day into blocks dedicated to completing high-priority tasks. Most importantly, adjust as you go! Every evening, look at what you’ve accomplished and change your plans for the remaining week to accommodate the to-dos you didn’t finish. You might even have to put “Manage To-Do List,” on your list.

2. Have a warm-up and wind-down routine. 

When you work from home, it’s easy to jump straight from bed to your desk without even changing out of your pajamas. But it’s not a good idea! Just as you need to separate your work space and personal space, you need to separate your work life and your personal life. So have a routine to both warm up and wind down from work. In the morning, this probably means showering, brushing your teeth, getting dressed and having breakfast. In the evening, find an activity that helps you switch from work mode to personal mode – whether that’s removing a suit or a relaxing cup of tea.

3. Eat well.

Working remotely often means you have access to your kitchen throughout the days. But instead of taking advantage, many of us work through lunch and order delivery, or gorge ourselves on coffee shop pastries. If you’re lucky enough to work steps from your kitchen, use it! Eating nutritious meals keeps your energy up and lets you stay productive. So have breakfast, good lunches and dinner. Don’t want to cook during your workday? There are several recipes for make-ahead meals floating about the web. Prefer to eat out? At least have something nutritious instead of what is essentially candy.

4. Make distractions harder.

It’s tough to stay focused when you don’t have superiors looking over your shoulder, but there are several techniques you can try. Connect all your entertainment devices to a power strip you can turn off easily. Dedicate certain devices to work and others for play. Use programs like Freedom to restrict your access to certain websites or even the whole Internet. Write important documents on your smartphone and close any non-business tabs on your browser. Really struggling? Get out of the house  – even if you’re at a coffee shop with WiFi, you might feel public pressure to avoid watching Netflix.

5. Get the right tools.

Working remotely comes with its own set of challenges. Luckily, there are several tools out there to make it easier. Track billable hours with Toggl. Use Google Docs to share meeting agendas, and Basecamp to stay in touch with the team. You should also have several offline tools to work with when you want to stay off the Internet, like a good notebook and a text editor. Need something we haven’t mentioned? Check out the options on this list.

6. Track your time. 

Every worker should track where their time goes. But it’s especially important for people who don’t have built-in accountability partners working right next to them. Some workers like to manually write down what they’ve accomplished in certain time intervals – the Pomodoro technique works great for this. Others like a digital method. For those, we suggest installing RescueTime, which will automatically track your activity.

7. Communicate with the office.

Whether you’re the only digital nomad or part of a distributed team, staying connected to your co-workers and superiors can be tough. But there are several ways you can communicate effectively with the rest of your team. Sync with the team at the beginning or end of each work day. Designate certain hours in which co-workers can reach you, so they’re not bothering you as you are focused on a project. Update your superiors and teammates regularly on your projects; this keeps everyone in the loop, makes sure your accomplishments are noted when it’s review season, and gives you the motivation that comes when others recognize your accomplishment. Finally, be careful of how you talk to each other! It’s tough to read cues when you’re communicating on the Internet. Try using emoticons, be specific and always assume your colleagues have good intentions. Need clarification? Just ask.

8. Manage your energy.

People who work in offices rarely spend hours on end in front of their computers. They get up regularly for bathroom breaks, water breaks and just to chat with their neighbor across the way. But remote workers often spend too much time in front of their computers. Instead of feeling happy and fulfilled at the end of each day, you might feel drained and exhausted – which is no fun! So it’s important to manage your energy. Take short breaks throughout the day, ideally 5-10 minutes every hour. And build rituals into your day that help you stay focused! The flexibility that comes with a remote worker’s schedule means it’s OK to take a walk, a power nap, meditate or hit the gym when you need to.

9. Be present during meetings.

It’s tough enough to pay attention to a meeting when you’re sitting in the same room. If you’re just listening to people on Skype, sometimes the distractions of the Internet can be too much. But what if you miss something important? Take notes if you have to, but make sure you are present during meetings. Having trouble? Think of how upset you’d be if nobody paid attention to a meeting you were leading.

10. Take advantage.

Working remotely has some downsides, but there are a ton of upsides too. You can set your own schedule. You can hang out with your dog. You can even do some work while on a beach in Costa Rica! After a while of working remotely, you’ll learn exactly what you need to be productive while maintaing a good balance between your professional and personal lives. And a lot of those necessities are things you might not have access to if you worked in an office! So take advantage of working remotely – whatever that means to you.

Liked this? Check out 10 Productivity Tips for Remote Workers!

Written by Sasha Graffagna

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