How I Learned to Separate Myself from My Self-Talk

“Your mind is always eavesdropping on your self-talk.”

I first heard this quote by Jim Kwik on his podcast with James Altucher but I didn’t think much of it. Ironic, perhaps.

What I mean is that I thought, “Wow, interesting,”… and then nothing.

A couple of months after that, I was listening to another Altucher podcast with Michael A. Singer, author of The Untethered Soul and The Surrender Experiment.

He said that one day he woke up and realized he wasn’t his thoughts. He was separate. He didn’t have to listen to them.

I remember being in the gym when I was listening to it. I remember slowing down. I remember thinking, “Yeah… I guess I’m not my thoughts.”

And then I had a test.

I went out with this girl. She was smart, pretty, funny. Everything I wanted.

After the date, things stopped going how I wanted them to go. She seemed more distant. She was less talkative. She was giving no energy to “us.”

My writing was going better than ever, I was getting more subscribers and followers; I’d just self-published my first book.

And I was angry. Stressed. Unhappy.

Because of her.

Well, no. Because of how I was thinking about her.

And when I realized that, I thought about something else Singer had said.

This thing that’s happening to me that I think is bad… What if I thought it was a good thing?

What if I thought that what was happening with this girl was a good thing?

I’d be happy.

I think that’s when I realized I’m not my thoughts — but I create my thoughts.

When I started thinking what was happening was a good thing, I knew what to do.

I wanted to cut her off. I wanted to write about it. I wanted to be grateful for other things in my life instead of hateful about this.

So I did all of those things.

Not long after, I saw this quote from Jim Kwik again.

“Your mind is always eavesdropping on your self talk.”

It made sense to me.

But how often do I notice that I’m eavesdropping on my self talk? And how often do I do anything about eavesdropping on my self talk?

How often do I think something and think that’s all I can think? How often do I explore why a thought is the thought I’m thinking? How often do I completely sever myself from my thoughts and just notice them without emotion?

And how often do I think, “What if I thought this was a good thing?”

Wouldn’t I have a happier life if I did?

My mind is no doubt always eavesdropping on my self-talk.

I’ve learned that I don’t have to listen to it.

I’ve learned that I can change my self-talk.

I’ve learned that I’m the leader of my self-talk.

The clue is in the name.

Liked this? Check out With Great Responsibility Comes Great Power: The Lesson Jim Kwik Taught Me!

Written by Matt Hearnden

“Your mind is always eavesdropping on your self-talk.”

I first heard this quote by Jim Kwik on his podcast with James Altucher but I didn’t think much of it. Ironic, perhaps.

What I mean is that I thought, “Wow, interesting,”… and then nothing.

A couple of months after that, I was listening to another Altucher podcast with Michael A. Singer, author of The Untethered Soul and The Surrender Experiment.

He said that one day he woke up and realized he wasn’t his thoughts. He was separate. He didn’t have to listen to them.

I remember being in the gym when I was listening to it. I remember slowing down. I remember thinking, “Yeah… I guess I’m not my thoughts.”

And then I had a test.

I went out with this girl. She was smart, pretty, funny. Everything I wanted.

After the date, things stopped going how I wanted them to go. She seemed more distant. She was less talkative. She was giving no energy to “us.”

My writing was going better than ever, I was getting more subscribers and followers; I’d just self-published my first book.

And I was angry. Stressed. Unhappy.

Because of her.

Well, no. Because of how I was thinking about her.

And when I realized that, I thought about something else Singer had said.

This thing that’s happening to me that I think is bad… What if I thought it was a good thing?

What if I thought that what was happening with this girl was a good thing?

I’d be happy.

I think that’s when I realized I’m not my thoughts — but I create my thoughts.

When I started thinking what was happening was a good thing, I knew what to do.

I wanted to cut her off. I wanted to write about it. I wanted to be grateful for other things in my life instead of hateful about this.

So I did all of those things.

Not long after, I saw this quote from Jim Kwik again.

“Your mind is always eavesdropping on your self talk.”

It made sense to me.

But how often do I notice that I’m eavesdropping on my self talk? And how often do I do anything about eavesdropping on my self talk?

How often do I think something and think that’s all I can think? How often do I explore why a thought is the thought I’m thinking? How often do I completely sever myself from my thoughts and just notice them without emotion?

And how often do I think, “What if I thought this was a good thing?”

Wouldn’t I have a happier life if I did?

My mind is no doubt always eavesdropping on my self-talk.

I’ve learned that I don’t have to listen to it.

I’ve learned that I can change my self-talk.

I’ve learned that I’m the leader of my self-talk.

The clue is in the name.

Liked this? Check out With Great Responsibility Comes Great Power: The Lesson Jim Kwik Taught Me!

Written by Matt Hearnden

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